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Changing Drive Letter Assignment on Boot Drive

Q: Changing Drive Letter Assignment on Boot Drive

Hey Guys,

Heres the issue. I recently did an install of XP home on a new HDD for a customer after their drive went dead. Not realizing, the install mapped the boot drive to F instead of C. Customer called up complaining that he could not install programs, etc... I wanted to go back and change the drive letters through the registry, but after doing some reading, found that changing the system drive letter after install will make windows act screwey, sometimes not even allowing a boot. I personally can live with a diff. drive letter, but the customer seems to not be able to.

I have read one or two posts about using XXclone to clone the system drive to a new partition mapped to C, then deleting the F partition. As i have never used this program or method, i am a bit skeptical, and/or lost at the same time. What do you guys suggest as the best method to change this drive letter and not disrupt the operations of the system?

Thanks in advance for the help

RELEVANCY SCORE 200
Preferred Solution: Changing Drive Letter Assignment on Boot Drive

I recommend downloading and running Reimage. It's a computer repair tool that has been proven to identify and fix many Windows problems with a high level of success.

I've used it in the past to identify and fix everything from blue screens (BSOD's), ActiveX errors, corrupt files and processes, dll/exe/sys errors, recover lost memory, Windows update problems, defragging, malware removal etc.

You can download it direct from this link http://downloadreimage.com/download.php. (This link will automatically start a download of Reimage that you can save to your computer.)

A: Changing Drive Letter Assignment on Boot Drive

You could try the method given here:http://support.microsoft.com/kb/223188But I can't guarantee it will work.

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RELEVANCY SCORE 108.8

So I've been playing around with my computer which has two internal hard drives - I installed Fedora on the secondary and that's been all fine. Then I used Darik's Boot n Nuke to wipe my main drive clean and I installed a fresh copy of XP on it.

For some reason Windows setup has sort of randomly assigned letters to the drives; e.g. The secondary drive that boots Fedora was called F in Windows but is now C - and the drive that Windows installed on named itself G (it was previously C of course).

When I chose which drive to install on I noticed setup was assigning these letters but didn't see a way to change it at the time and didn't think it would matter. I read somewhere here earlier today that the boot drive really should be named C and it will cause problems if it isn't.

The thing is, both Windows and Linux are operating fine; I've installed several apps and drivers into XP and with no problem.

Will having XP on G instead of C cause me problems down the road? I don't want to get knee deep in reinstalling all of my drivers and apps to find out I'll have to go through it again...

A:[SOLVED] Boot Drive Letter Assignment

Hi bdemonbr,

I presume that when you reinstalled Windows? you still had the secondary Drive connected...

The only way that you will be able to get Windows? back as the C: Drive is to either try booting it without the Fedora Drive connected, and see if it will revert back to C: on boot up...if not, you'll have to use "Boot N Nuke" again and start afresh...This time make sure that the Fedora Drive is disconnected.

In the event that Windows? does revert the "Windows?" Drive back to C:, you will need to connect the Fedora Drive as a 'Slave' so that you can reallocate its Drive letter.

Kind Regards,

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RELEVANCY SCORE 107.6

In a dual boot Window XP system I'd like to be able to have multiple operating systems yet have drive letter C: assigned to the system I select during boot up. The reason is that I want to build multiple systems by building 1 then cloning it to another partition instead of taking the time to build another system. I guess I could have multiple primary partitions on a single drive then just change which one is active. But what if I have 2 hard drives and I want to change which 1 get the C: drive letter. Is there some way to change the hard drive priority? I don't recall that in my BIOS. I'm just trying to save the time and effort of creating and maintaining multiple operating systems.

A:Windows XP dual-boot and OS drive letter assignment

You can clone a system to another Drive and if there is no other HDD on the computer, it will be C: drive(ex) you have 2 HDD's that are the same size. You have Windows and all your applications, drivers and updates on Drive 1. You clone drive 1 to drive 2. Now if you unplug Drive 1, and boot the computer, Drive 2 becomes the C: drive. Plug drive 1 back in, and boot the computer and if Drive 1 is the first HDD in the boot order, that will be C: drive and Drive 2 will be the D: drive.
For your scenario, you can make a Clone Image of Drive 1, and use that same image to clone to several HDD's.

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RELEVANCY SCORE 100.8

Well, I was lucky. The HD that failed this morning, works if I lay it on its side. So I was able to ghost everything over to the new drive. I ghosted the boot partition c: to r:

I'm using Windows 2000, SP4. The new boot drive is SATA. The old, failing boot drive is IDE.

I worked through a number of problems, but I'm left with this:

When the system boots into the new drive R:, it still wants the boot partition c: for something. If I boot with the IDE disconnected, it'll boot to the login screen, and allow me to log in, but after a few minutes of a blank screen & cursor, it drops back to the login.

I have PartitionMagic 7.0, and used DriveMapper to change all references to C: to R:, but that didn't do it. How do I cut my system's dependence on the failing drive, before it fails altogether? Will this work?

I found the following advice from crjdriver, and was wondering if this would work for my particular problem:

Make a full system backup of the computer and system state.
Log on as an Administrator.
Start Regedt32.exe.
Go to the following registry key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\MountedDevices

Click MountedDevices.
On the Security menu, click Permissions.
Verify that Administrators have full control. Change this back when you are finished with these steps.
Quit Regedt32.exe, and then start Regedit.exe.
Locate the following registry key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\MountedDevices

Find the drive letter you want to change to (new). Look for "\... Read more

A:Solved: Drive letter assignment problems with ghosted drive

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RELEVANCY SCORE 100.4

I have Vista Home Premium with two 320 GB internal hard drives © & (E). I am trying to put Vista on drive E and upgrade to Windows 7 on drive C.
I had successfully cloned the drive C of Vista onto an external hard drive and copied it to drive E (the second internal hard drive). When I copied the cloned copy of Vista to drive E, the system changed the drive letter to L. Everything was working fine and I could boot into either C or L.
In a fit of neatness I guess, I decided that I would like to have the newly labeled drive L designated as drive E again and changed it to drive E in "Disk Management" while I was booted into drive C.
Now I am unable to boot into the second internal drive. I just get a blank screen. I can get "Task Manager" but nothing else, not even the "Start" icon.
I booted back into C and changed the drive back to L, but that didn't work either.
I tried to boot the second internal drive in Safe Mode, but just got a blank screen, without the start icon.
I tried restoring to a previous date, but that wouldn't work and it only restores C anyway.
When I'm booted in drive C, it shows the second internal drive L and shows all the files and programs that should be on drive L.
How do I get the drive restored so I can boot into it?
Thanks to anyone that can help.

A:can't boot to second internal hard drive after changing drive letter

I don't know if this helps, but is drive L still marked as an "active" partition in disk management?  When you right click the partition the option should be there to do so if it is not marked as such. 

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RELEVANCY SCORE 99.6

Hey kids:

I'm in a bit of a pickle here. I have my suspicions what the problem is and I hope I'm not right.

Recently my computer died. I pulled my hard drives and DVD drives and stuffed them in another box. I turned it on and it repeatedly restarted after a blue screen of death. The blue screen went by so fast I couldn't read it. Soooo, I reinstalled Windows XP Pro and SP3. After doing so, my second HD is not being assigned a drive letter. Device Manager sees it, Disk Manager sees it and says it's healthy, active and NTFS. Is there anything in the Registry I can change to make it accessible? (ALL of my music and personal documents are on this drive and I can't afford to lose ANY of it.) Or do I have to format it for the OS to recognize it as a drive? Please help soon.

Thanks.
 

A:Solved: Second hard-drive drive letter assignment

Hi.
Right click My Computer, click management, then enter the "Disk management application on the left.
Right click the drive that has no letter, click "Change drive letter and paths, Click add, choose an unused drive letter, click OK, and you're set.
 

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RELEVANCY SCORE 96.4

i need to get dos support for my pcmcia cdrom on a toshiba laptop running win2k, and cant seem to figure it out...any ideas???

thanks

[Edited by CleoOrlando on 05-25-2001 at 12:23 AM]
 

A:drive letter assignment

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RELEVANCY SCORE 96.4

Hey everyone! Here's what the situation is:
 
I have a brand new hard drive. I set up a Dell Utility partition using the disk from Dell. Once that was done, I installed Windows XP Home on the unallocated partition. Everything set up just fine, but now the hard drive doesn't have the letter assignment I want. If you do the DISKPART command, the partition with Windows on it shows as C. When you boot your system and actually use Windows though, the hard drive shows up as I. Why don't they match? I want my drive to be C. What do I need to do to change it to C? I know I can't use the disk management tool because of the whole system volume thing.
 
Would I need to use the Windows Repair or the full installation? I have not added any programs to the computer because I wanted to get this issue resolved first. I saw instructions on Microsoft for "How to restore the system/boot drive letter in Windows". It says you shouldn't use it unless the drive somehow changed names on its own. I don't know if it's safe to follow or not. The instructions were at: http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=223188
 
Please help. I want to be able to get my desktop up and running again. Thanks in advance.

 

A:Drive letter assignment

Go to Disk Management...post a screenshot reflecting all hard drives/partitions, please.
 
How To Capture And Edit A Screen Shot. - http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/topic43088.html
 
Louis

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RELEVANCY SCORE 96.4

Ok. I just partitioned my hard drive to install a second OS on it. In doing so it asked me if i wanted to assign my partitions letters because it resized my primary partition and created another one. Being the dumbass i am i mistakenly clicked no. So my primary hard partition won't boot Windows xp pro cause it's not assigned the Drive letter C. How can i assign this a drive letter without deleting my data on the hard drive? thanx....
 

A:Drive Letter Assignment!!!! Please Help....

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RELEVANCY SCORE 96.4

Troubleshooting a corrupted drive, so installed it on a working PC as a slave. Got it working long enough to pull the data. Drive letter assigned was "M". Shutdown, removed drive, boot. Drive letter was STILL showing up.
-Tried Disk Management in WXP, no luck.
-Tried command line removal, no luck.
-Used TweakUI to remove the drive from the list, which is great, but I still cannot assign "M" to any other device. I can live with it, but I'm curious if anyone has a solution.
 

A:Drive Letter Assignment

[tsg=welcome][/tsg]

Hi There!

The only guarentee of resolving you delemma would be to format and Reinstall Windows. That can be alot of work, but if you're having system issues and such, wiping the drive and reinstalling windows should resolve most id not all of the problems.
Good Luck!

ST
 

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RELEVANCY SCORE 96.4

I use an external USB HD which contains my Backing Tracks recorded through Cubase.

I transfer as MP3 files to Karaoke Creator software and add the lyrics. the resultant ,BIN file I use as an on stage lyrics monitor because I have a terrible memory.

I have a problem with my on stage portable and need to use the external drive on another computer.

The drive has an operating system assigned drive letter G. and all the files are locked to this Path

The computer I want to use does not have drive letter G available because it was once assigned to a second CD/DVD drive.

How can I unlock this assignment. do I have to refit the CD/DVD drive and re-assign it to another letter
 

A:Drive letter Assignment

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RELEVANCY SCORE 96.4

I installed a new disk into a machine and left the old disk as back up. I set the new disk to master and the old disk to slave. I then used ghost and took an image of the old disk and put it directly onto the new disk. Here is the problem.

The old disk maintained the C and D drive letter and the new drive with the system partition is G. I can play with the registry to change the system drive to C, but this will create several problems.

If I take an image of the new disk and then reapply it without the old disk in the machine which is using the C letter assignment used by windows, will the disk get the correct letter assignments? If this works correctly, it should also update the shortcuts and everything.

A:Drive letter assignment

Hi,

Here is the problem. You can't change the disk you are booting from, so you have to do a work around.

For example, if you can boot (don't know if you can) from the D drive and have the old disk in as slave, then you can probably change the old drive to maybe F or some unused letter. Then put that drive that you changed to the boot drive position (boot from the F drive) (assuming it keeps that letter you assigned it) With the new drive (now D) in as a slave, you can assign it an unused letter like C:, then when you put it back in as boot drive, you have accomplished what you want. Long process, but it works most of the time. I assume you know the process of changing the letter assignments, but if you don't let me know.

Don't forget, you have to deal with the boot drive in BIOS setup also so it selects the correct one to boot from.

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RELEVANCY SCORE 96.4

The original drive in my PC has 3 partitions, C: , D: , and E:. I have just added a second drive to my PC with only 1 partition. The problem is that my computer has assigned drive letter "D:" to the second drive and has reassigned my original drive partitions to C: , E: , and F:. This problem has messed up some shortcuts to say the least. How can I get my computer to assign drive letter "F:" to my second drive. I am not able to change fixed drive letter assignments in the device manager.

System specs:
win98se
AMD Athlon
Soyo SY-K7V Dragon motherboard
Original drive: Western Digital WD307AA
2nd drive: Seagate ST340810A
Both drives are on IDE1
IDE's: IDE1, IDE2, IDE3, IDE4
Thanks
 

A:drive letter assignment

Hi export5, welcome to TSG....

If I'm not mistaken, I think that is the way windows will treat a second hard drive if the first is partitioned......

You might take a look here to understand how drive letters are assigned:

http://www.microsoft.com/mspress/troubleshooting/Solutions/89.asp
 

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RELEVANCY SCORE 95.2

OS=XP

2 questions:

1. I inserted a Cruzer SD drive into an open USB port. The computer assigns the drive the letter K. I wish for the drive to be assigned G. The Cruzer is already in the uppermost of two USB ports. Is there a way I can force XP to call the Cruzer G instead of K?

2. Someone had apparently inserted and removed a USB flash drive several times on this same computer without properly closing and ejecting the device. As a result, XP had cycled through the alphabet to the next available letter. I had set a third party backup program to go to a particular drive letter. I know that I could (and did) reboot the computer allowing the computer to recognize that the drive letters it thought were in use were not and for the computer to then reorder all available drive letters. However IS THERE a way to force XP, without rebooting, to reset available drive letters? Clicking on my computer in explorer and hitting the View/Refresh does not work.

A:USB Flash Drive assignment letter

You can reset them yourself manually, using Device Manager. If a letter is already in use, you cannot use it...unless you change it to something else that is not in use.

I start at the end of the alphabet and assign drive letters to storage partitions. C: is the system partition by default, D: is the optical drive by default...anything between D: and the latter characters of the alphabet will be assigned letters E:, etc.

Aside from doing a repair install or something similar...I don't know of a way to force an automatic reassignment of letters.

Louis

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RELEVANCY SCORE 95.2

Hi all. Cloned my main HD [C:] to my new hard drive, which was detected on my system as [F:]. All went well, except I encountered a small problem and did a Windows XP Repair Install.

Now, my problem is, I removed the [C:] drive and booted from the [F:] drive as my main drive was failing. However, all of my programs are not working because of the fact the drive is [F:] and their roots still say the files are on [C:].

So, I go into Disk Management and attempt to change the letter of F: to C:. However, Windows tells me "Windows cannot modify the drive letter of your system volume or boot volume."

I need this drive to be C:. Anyone know how to bypass this at all???
 

A:Drive Letter Assignment -- Big Issue

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RELEVANCY SCORE 95.2

I have just installed WinXP on a computer and the Letter assigned to the hard drive is E: not C:
I had two HDDs connected when it was installing. The primary master, which was the drive that WinXP was being installed on, and the primary slave, which had WinXP on it but had died and I was going to try to retrieve the data off it. The jumpers were set correctly and the bios was set correctly as well.
I also tried removing the second HDD and rebooting but the drive assignment is still;
A: Floppy
D: CD ROM
E: Master HDD

I don't seem to be able to find how to change the drive letters so the main HDD can be C:, is it elsewhere in XP because I remember in Win98 it is in the device manager.
 

A:Hard Drive Letter Assignment

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RELEVANCY SCORE 95.2

Hi All

First post here.

This is the system that I used to have. An SSD with XP32, and another HDD with Win7x64. I first started with XP and then later installed 7. When I installed Win7 it called the partition that it was installed on "C:" (even though the XP installation claimed its partition to be C. I set up a BCD (on the SSD) to allow me to boot into either XP (which I believe it did by looking at the boot.ini on that drive) or to boot into Win7 using pointers in the BCD? (I am not so familiar with how BCDs and MBRs work). So long story short, both OSs thought that they were installed on C: and everything was fine, each saw the other partition as D:. So all the programs and everything all pointed to C:, because the C: designation was relative at that point.

Now I just got a larger SSD and I wanted to image both the OSs onto the new SSD (in separate partitions). Seeing as the new SSD had no MBR or BCD, once both the OSs were on it, I had to build a BCD. When bootrec.exe was scanning the OSs it found 2 Win7 installations (one from the HDD and one from the SSD). I asked it to create pointers to both and figured that I would use something else to create a pointer to the XP installation later. What happened is that it considered the HDD Win7 to be C: and the SSD Win7 to be D:. The OS would boot from the SSD but kept looking to C: to run programs, because the image that it came from used to think that it was C: and all the pointers for executables and etc were to ... Read more

A:Drive Letter assignment for OS, want multiple OSs to think they are C:

The conventional use of Windows and other OSes dictated that you can have only one drive letter per partition [each HDD needs at least one partition], i.e. can't have two C: drivers. Check your BIOS, the 0 or 1 drive is usually the boot drive [first drive scanned for bootable files] and gets the letter C:. But the newer computers may have changed that.

I'd think it possible to install two versions of Windows on different partitions on the HDD and from all I've seen and read it has been best to install the oldest OS first and newest OS last. I haven't tried installing Win7 after Win8 yet.

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RELEVANCY SCORE 95.2

Hi,

Just moments ago finished an XP install on a 20GB harddrive partitioned 2 ways of equal size. This is a routine thing I go through every few months, but this time around my OS partition recieved D:\ while my backup/resevoir partition which was D:\ before, got bumped up to C:\.

It's not a big deal but I like to have familiarity and this is disorienting.

Can I reassign the drive letters somehow?

Thanks in advance,

A:Weird drive letter assignment.

Here ya go..............:D

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RELEVANCY SCORE 95.2

Im having a problem with my drive letter assignment. I have two hardrives one C and the other E, also have to CD drives. My drive E keep getting change to D, usually when I rebooy about 2 or thre times and then the drive changes letter.. Dont know why is happening, check hardrive connection and its good. this began in the last few days. Can anyone help please.

A:drive letter assignment problem.

Do you want to keep your 2nd hdd as "E" or is it better it permanently becomes "D"? If yes, check these out:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/307844/en-us
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/d....mspx?mfr=true

By the way, what is your "legit" D drive?

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RELEVANCY SCORE 95.2

I am facing a really strange kind of problem with my system.

I am a total newbie when it comes to Win 8. A couple of earlier attempts resulted in frustration with GUI and simply gave up. Now I have a good size order for PCs on hand, win 7 licenses are no longer available so have to go with 8.1

My client can get hold of enterprise version licenses at a very reasonable price so was trying out to learn to setup the systems the way he likes and needs. Somehow even after 4 attempts I can't get it to work the way I want.

I have 2 Seagate drives, one 2 Tb and one 750 GB. 2 x 4GB memory chips, Intel DH77EB motherboard and i3-3220T processor.

The initial problem was of data corruption and had to turn off the fast boot feature in power settings. The next problem is very difficult to solve.

It does not recognise even the NTFS volumes in the extended partitions. When it does it won't allow read or write access. Even if I change the permissions it won't retain them. It keeps changing the assigned drive letters to USB attached drives even when I attach them one at a time and assign proper letters that I want it will juggle them around randomly after the next boot. The missing volume phenomenon occurs even with the USB attached drives.

Every time I do a fresh install it comes up with totally different set of permissions about accessing the drives. The files and folders I cansee and access from Win 7 OS are too often simply not visible.

One time it allowed me to install even 32 bit F... Read more

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RELEVANCY SCORE 95.2

This may be a simple question from a simple mind, it has me stumped and I don't know why.
I have 2 flash drives to backup files, one gets assigned as E: drive, the other gets assigned as F: drive. What gives?
This is a problem because of scheduling the backup.
Jeff
 

A:Flash drive letter assignment

So what's the problem?

Basic Drive Assignments:
A, B floppies
C primary boot drive
D second hard drive or CD/DVD R/W drive
E thru Z other devices. Virtual drives, USB drives and devices
 

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RELEVANCY SCORE 95.2

We just installed an additional 20 gig hd in our 2139 Aptiva e5d. when rebooted, it did not come up with a drive letter, however in the system info it exists. When we went into "device manager" it had no letter assigned, and we were not able to assign one there. In F1 setup it showed both the master and slave correctly. How can we get it a drive letter? We have a cd drive on "G" a cd-rw on "H" and floppy on "A" and our master is "c". Info appreciated!
 

A:new hard drive letter assignment

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RELEVANCY SCORE 95.2

My laptop computer has a built-in card reader for Memory Sticks and SD cards to which Windows 7 assigns two drive letters. As I never use the Memory Stick reader I would like to use the drive letter assigned to it for one of the partitions of the hard disk. The problem is that the Memors Stick reader does not show up in Disk Management as long as it is empty - and I haven't got any Memory Stick. How can I re-assign the card reader's drive letter although there is no Memory Stick inserted?

A:Drive letter assignment problem

  
Quote: Originally Posted by avoelp


My laptop computer has a built-in card reader for Memory Sticks and SD cards to which Windows 7 assigns two drive letters. As I never use the Memory Stick reader I would like to use the drive letter assigned to it for one of the partitions of the hard disk. The problem is that the Memors Stick reader does not show up in Disk Management as long as it is empty - and I haven't got any Memory Stick. How can I re-assign the card reader's drive letter although there is no Memory Stick inserted?


If the card reader has 2 drivers you may be able to disable the unused one.

Please go to start>search>type device manager.
Are there any "unknown devices" with yellow triangles on them?
Is you driver there , listed, and working?

If not why does it matter what drive letter a partition has?

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RELEVANCY SCORE 95.2

Hi there,

I installed Windows 7 to test it on my PC (I still use XP for most purposes). Now I want to reinstall it because I want to try a different version. Unfortunately, I would have to re-assign all drives again and I have a lot of them.

So my question is this: Is there any way to save the current assignment and restore it when I have reinstalled Windows?

TIA
SoWhy

I got access to MSDNAA through my university account. Not that that's relevant to this question ;-)

A:Save drive letter assignment?

The easiest way might be to open Regedit, navigate to the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\MountedDevices folder, make sure the MountedDevices folder is highlighted on the left, then do File->Export and save the registry keys somewhere. It should save as a .reg file. Upon reinstallation, just double click on the file and it should import them back to restore the settings.

Make SURE after you export the keys to verify that they were all saved and reflect what is currently in the registry by right clicking on the saved .reg file and opening in notepad/wordpad.

I believe this should work.

For reference, check out Option Two below:
http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials...ndows-7-a.html

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RELEVANCY SCORE 95.2

Ok, the computer i'm working on currently went through a lot of stuff, basically it stopped "seeing" both hard drives... it's a dell, so I look at the array, and it sees them there, so I decide to format both of the drives (the user had backed up all their information thankfully) however now it says that C: is a removable media and F: is my boot, which would be all well and dandy, but I'm trying to download drivers from a website, and it won't let me choose where to download to, and it tries to download to c, which won't work. So is there a way I can change the boot drive to C? Maybe by switching the ide cables possibly?

A:Changing Boot Drive Letter

Actually since the system has made drive F: your boot drive and C: a removable media the only real way is to re-format the drives and re-install Windows again but this time you have to read the screens as to where the installation is formatting and where it is putting things. Basically you read every screen and you will find it.

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RELEVANCY SCORE 95.2

I was doing a new installation of XP home on a new hard drive, XP formatted the drive as F:\ and installed the boot sector there because a thumb drive was in the usb port (which it recognized as C:\). I wasn't paying that close of attention and I didn't realize XP would see that thumb drive as C:\. My question: is there any way to change the boot letter back to C: without reformatting the hard drive?
 

A:Changing Boot drive Letter

Yes there is.
Go to start > Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Computer management > Storage > Disk management.
Then right click on drive, and choose change drive letter / path
 

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RELEVANCY SCORE 95.2

I installed a new hard drive and installed winxp pro. Not realizing it at the time, it was installing on drive F. Now of course the windows drive is not c. as it should be but f instead. Although it works fine, it is very annoying to see f:\windows. Is there any way to change this without re-installing windows?

I know how it happened. The new drive that was installed was on IDE 1 as the Primary Master. I was under the impression that if I simply swapped the drive to IDE 0 it would correct the problem but I am obviously mistaken. I thought maybe I could use PQ Magic to remap the drives. Not sure though.

Really could use some advice here. I can't stand it anymore!
 

A:Changing the boot drive letter.

Give this a read to see if it applies to your situation

http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=307844
 

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RELEVANCY SCORE 95.2

Hi all,new here to the forums i have a question reguarding my boot drive leter.
recently bought a ssd installed my edition of win7pro 64 onto it
no problems except i had my old hdd still plugged in which was my c drive letter ,thus i installed operating system onto my ssd with an e drive letter.ok so i have tried to run a couple of programmes which i use which have failed because the programme is looking for a specific file in c boot directory which i obviously havent got....hope you can understand what im getting at.so big question how do i change my ssd boot drive letter to :c and that all my existing programmes will still work.
many thanks for any help

A:Changing boot drive letter ?

programs that you have installed onto the drive after the OS that need to call files other than the EXE to work will not know where to look for them, and likely have to be re-installed.

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RELEVANCY SCORE 94

Just tried to install a SCSI hard drive on a win98 system.

Drive is in Device Manager but has no Letter assigned. Does not allow me to.

BIOS recognizes drive and assigns D:
 

A:SCSI Hard Drive - No Letter Assignment

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RELEVANCY SCORE 93.2

I had to reformat my hard drive using an external drive bay. I used the external drive bay to reformat the drive. I had to reassign the drive letter from C to G. Originally the drive was C. The drive has a small unallocated partition. When I boot the drive up under DOS, the drive boots up with a default drive letter of X. And a directory of Sources. I want to reassign the drive as G or C. Can someone help out on this. (I am running Windows 7)
 

A:Messy Hard Drive Letter Assignment Problem

When I boot the drive up under DOSClick to expand...

You installed a version of DOS? Exactly what version of DOS (not sure it makes a difference)? Exactly what partitions are on the drive?

the drive boots up with a default drive letter of X.Click to expand...

Meaning what? That the partition with DOS installed has drive letter X? What other drive letters are assigned?

(I am running Windows 7)Click to expand...

Does this comment have any bearing on booting DOS or the drive letter assignment you want to do?
 

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RELEVANCY SCORE 93.2

What I use my computer for mostly is downloading music, and then burning CDs and archiving the original files on DVDs. Recently, due to (what I eventually came to understand was) a cyclicac redundancy error, Nero and my burner kind of seized up on me. Through various searches of places like this, I was led into uninstalling and re-installing Nero (with no problems) and then doing the same for my burner.

The burner is an NEC ND-3520A, I'm using Windows XP.

After reinstalling the burner using the Windows Installation "Wizard", I realized that I was left with an "empty" (unassigned?) D: drive, which was where my burner used to be, and now the burner had become the E: drive. Didn't think much of it at first, because CDs burned fine, as did DVDs. Then I got to the next step in my archiving process, which is verifying the .shn and .flac music files to make sure the burn was good. And it just took FOREVER, probably about 5x the normal speed.

Granted, I'm only assuming this problem is related to the drive letters, because that's the only change I was able to notice. I did try the Control Panel>Administrative Tools> Computer Management > Disk Management thing, but all that's listed there are my 2 hard drives and not my burner. The burner is listed under Removable Storage > Libraries, where there is no option for changing the drive letter. (If that's even the problem to begin with).

Anyhow, the main problem seems to be ... Read more

A:Trouble with CD/DVD burner, possibly the drive letter assignment

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RELEVANCY SCORE 93.2

Hi,

The drive letter of my boot/active Win7 partition should be C:, but in my case it isn't; the boot/active partition drive letter is F.

I've tried to move heaven and earth to change the drive letter of the boot partition but nothing works.

So, aren't there any apps, tools or utilities to change the drive letter of my current boot partition?

Thanks in advance,
Johan

A:Changing Drive Letter of Boot/Active partition

Nothing that I know of. My original Win 7 installation was "E" drive. I had considered things suggested but finally decided to let it be. It doesn't matter to Windows what the drive letter is, everything works regardless of the drive lettter. I later installed Windows 7 on an SSD drive, with a clean install (and the SSD drive the only drive connected during installation) and now back to the "C" drive.

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RELEVANCY SCORE 92.8

sir,

i have windows 7 desktop. there are some partition on it.but there is problem with these partition. All the three partition have the same drive letter.i attach a link showing the picture. all three partitions are dynamic , simple. if i open these drives only the contents of one drive are appeared. another two drive data are not shown in any manner.

i don't want to lose any data from any drive ......
please help me sir...
my windows is installed in c:\ drive which is also dynamic and there are no recent changes.only one change i did which is i shrink dynamic volume 50 GB from 206 GB and again mixed with 206 GB without allocating free space.

and only the c drive is on and d drive is off.but in my other desktop same configuration exist.
please help me...and please don't say change and remove drive letter...........waiting for response

A:changing one drive letter all 3 partitions change to that drive letter

First thing you're going to do is fill in the specs of the desktop whose snips you are showing us.

Then you're going to do the same with the second pc opening a second post with snips. Give it a different title like "Second pc with drive letters the same". Don't forget the snips.

You should not have dynamic disks in either machine. What did you do to accomplish this?

There exists a bevy of spectacular experts on this site that will be happy to help you. But give us ALL the info please.

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RELEVANCY SCORE 86.8

Is there any way at all of changing the drive letter of the main hard drive - which is obviously in use? Have got it set at 'I' by accident and want to return it to 'C' drive. I know about changing other drive letters and have done so easily enough but am stuck with this one. Is it forever???

A:Changing drive letter of main hard drive

Hello silver2142

You can change the drive letter of anything except the system partition.
Unfortunately, the only real way to change the system partition letter is to wipe and reinstall.

XP won`t mind being installed on "I". It is just an inconvenience to you.

.

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RELEVANCY SCORE 81.2

Hello!
I use an external USB2 IcyBox Hard Disk Drive. It started off as L: but after using a Flash Drive & hooking up my digital camera to the computer its current drive letter is N:It stays as N: even when other USB devices are removed.
I would much prefer this drive to remain at L: in a logical progression after all other drives & partitions I have installed.
How do I get it back to L: & how do I stop it from changing to another drive letter in the future, after using other USB devices?
I am using Windows XP Home SP2. I have one ATA harddrive, which has 4 partitions, (namely C: F: G: H, & two SCSI hard drives, (D: E. All hard drives are using NTFS.
Any help with this problem would be appreciated.
Many thanks,
Tim.
 

A:Changing Drive Letter.

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RELEVANCY SCORE 81.2

I just installed a new hard drive and it assigned in drive "F". How do I change? I have gone into Device Manager and I'm not getting it done. I m running XP Home Edition.

Thank you!
 

A:Changing Drive Letter???

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RELEVANCY SCORE 81.2

I was wondering how to go about changing my windows boot up disk letter from G to C.
 

A:Changing Drive Letter

The short answer: You can't. The letter is assigned when XP is installed.

In order to be sure that the drive is C:, it's best to install XP with other drives disconnected to a newly partitioned and formatted drive.
 

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RELEVANCY SCORE 81.2

I just re-did a computer and put XP pro on it. It had a 10GB 5200 rpm drive as the C: drive and 1.5 GB of that was used for the D: drive. I took out that drive and added a 40GB 7200 drive to it. The 40GB is the master on the primary channel and the 10GB drive is the slave on the same channel. When the format and install was done on the new drive it had a drive letter of G: and the 10GB drive had a drive letter of C: and D: respectfully. This configuration caused severe problems. I removed the 10GB drive and rebooted the machine and the problem is now gone. But I still want to use the 10GB drive for paging and music storage and so forth and so on. But the problem with that is that when ever I add a new drive it automatically grabs the first available drive letter and this brings back the problem from before. Is there a way to change the drive letter on the system drive? I tried it through disk management utility and it told me that it can not change the drive letter of the system disk. Any thoughts on this would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
 

A:Changing the drive letter.

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RELEVANCY SCORE 81.2

Hi, I have three hdd with three partitions with driver letter C: D: E:.
My C: and D: are tied together which means my D: drive used as temp drive (most of windows temp, cache, C:\users folder mklink to D:). I replicate all my data and both drives have same contents

Now my question is how I gonna change drive letter from
1. D:\ ----> E:\
2. E:\ -----> D:\ (exchange both drive letter).

I can't did this via disk management while windows in use since D: drive are locked with windows folders. I tried to change it through cmd prompt which boot from installation CD, but the drive letter seem different, and drive letter still remain as same after boot into windows.

Is there anyway to do it without reinstalling os?

A:Help on changing drive letter

Change, add, or remove a drive letter - Microsoft Windows Help

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RELEVANCY SCORE 81.2

Hello
I "reorganized" my Windows 7-64 bits PC (added some new disks, reorgabizing directories ...)
I renamed some of the disks so they are clear for me
But there is one disk I cannot change
I want to rename F: to Z:

Inside the Drive management Console, i can
- access disk F:
- select Z: as the new name letter

But whn i click to start the renaming i have an error message that says "Invalid parameter" or "Incorrect parameter" (I use a french version of Windows so the exact message is "param?tre incorrect"

Any idea where this could come from ? It seems all the disks are correctly defined and activated

Thanks for your help Have a good day

A:Changing drive letter

Post a maximized/resized screen print of Disk Management so all info is displayed using these instructions:
Disk Management - Post a Screen Capture Image

One possibility, if you have a Page File on F that might be why you can't change the drive letter.

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RELEVANCY SCORE 81.2

I just got a couple of new HDDs to make notebook backups (clones) on. When I first formatted each one, using a USB dock, I set the drive letter of each one to U. Everytime I change the drives, the drive letter changes itself to E. I change them back to U but they change themselves back to E the next time I put them in the dock. What is going on here and how can I keep the drive letters from changing?

A:HDD Drive Letter Keeps Changing

Set one to U and the other to V.

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RELEVANCY SCORE 81.2

Trying to use an application that will only look at the A: drive when looking for a license. No problem when using a floppy dirve.

The license key is on a flash drive and A: is not an option when in computer management trying to change the drive letter. Only get B: and above.

Is there a way to do this: change the B: designation to A:?

Running XP SP2.

Thanks in advance

A:Changing drive letter

If you have a floppy drive, I don't believe you can assign anything to A:.

If you don't have a floppy drive, then you should be able to assign it in Disk Management.

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RELEVANCY SCORE 81.2

Hey all - hope you guys can help me. Here's the problem:

I moved my vista partition in order to extend it - i wiped the OEM recovery partition, moved the vista one, and added the freespace created to it. This was all with gparted. All went well - all the data is still there, no problem.

However, now when I boot into vista, I get the normal log on screen, it shows my picture and username, but when I log on I get "preparing the desktop", and then it pops up a rundll32 error saying it cannot access the specified device/path/file. If I click okay, I get a light blue screen and a mouse. I can launch the task manager and run things like regedit, or launch explorer.exe. This gives me a plain desktop using a temporary profile because it cannot find mine.

Looking at Computer, it shows that the "C:" drive has been assigned the letter X. I think this is what's causing the problem.

I've tried editing the MountedDevices key in the registry to reassign it, but whatever I do the changes don't stick, and when I reboot it reverts back to the main system partition being X, and one I can't see being C.

Any ideas/links/tutorials/whatever are much appreciated...
 

A:Changing Drive Letter

Generally you should not change the drive letter of the system disk, since many windows files and setups rely on it staying how it was on install.

In general terms, it shouldn't matter what letter it is. The only exception is some old programs have C: hard coded in to them, rather than finding the real system disk, but this isn't usually an issue.

However, if I understand your post correctly, your disk was C:, but has changed to X:. I think this can indeed cause problems. You could have a look at http://support.microsoft.com/kb/223188/en-us but read the warnings very carefully and follow the advice, definitely regarding backing up.

You could also look at http://support.microsoft.com/kb/249321/ , which the first article links to.
 

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RELEVANCY SCORE 81.2

Hi, firstly, i apologize if this has been discussed before.

I followed the guide posted here to dual boot XP & 7. All's working fine now. I can boot into both the OS without any problems.

However, i've noticed that which ever OS i boot into, shows itself as installed on the C: drive. When in XP, 7 shows up on E: drive & when in 7, XP shows up on D: drive. I wanna change this. When i installed 7, i chose the D: drive &that's how i'd like it to remain.

So yeah, how do i go about changing the drive letter of 7 from C: to D:, so that it remains that way no matter which OS i boot into. Would it be safe to do this from Disk management in 7?

Note: Both the OS are installed on the same HDD.

I once again apologize if this has been asked before.

Cheers.

A:Changing 7 drive letter.

When custom installing a second copy of the same version, same edition using the same installation disk the second copy of Windows having started up the installer while in Windows will shift the second copy to other then C. When booting into a dual with two different versions or even two separate editions of the same version the normal sight is seeing C while in one and the other install as a different drive letter since C is in use at the time.

The best advice often seen with any dual boot and the optical drive being D would be giving the second Windows E, F, G, etc. if no other drive is present and doing the same while booted in the other to the first now second seen there in the DM.

For changing it from C to something else that would be the opposite of wanting to see the registry edit for correcting a goof of Windows getting the wrong letter like D assigned rather then the default C. How to restore the system/boot drive letter in Windows

Note that was directed at 2000, XP, and Server 2003 where this problem had been more apparent. Another guide covers what I was mentioning about how to Manage your drive letters in a dual-boot configuration

While the guide is older there for an XP/Vista dual boot the principles are the same as far as having the second OS always seeing the same drive while the Windows you are in at the moment is C.

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RELEVANCY SCORE 81.2

So, dumb problem, but forgive me for being an idiot..

I use an external hard drive to store my music collection. Recently, for no apparent reason, Windows re-assigned the drive letter signification of my external hard drive from "F:/" to "G:/". Now all the software I use that references the files on the hard drive is throwing errors saying it can't find the file, and my music player can't find any of the songs in the library.

I could manually change all the addresses in the software I use and re-load my music library but, um, that would suck.

How do I change the letter of a drive?


Thanks!

A:Changing Drive Letter

Is there an F: drive currently in My Computer? (hint: it might be a USB removable one)

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RELEVANCY SCORE 80.4

I don't understand how, but when I installed XP MCE, it was with all other drives disconnected. However, when I went to Disk Management, it's partition is labeled G:, while W7 is labeled L: when running MCE. I want to change G: to the usual C:. but Disk Management won't permit that, and when I tried something similar with Acronis Disk Director some time back, the OS would no longer boot, so I'm not anxious for a repeat performance.

The question is, how to relabel the partition safely?

A:Changing OS Partition Drive Letter

I wouldn't and don't think you can change it, not without re-installing. As you have seen Windows won't let you change the drive letter of the partition windows is installed too. The main reason is that doing that would break a lot of programs etc. They would be looking for the old drive letter not the new one. Do you have a flash card reader installed? If yes that would be my guess as to why the drive letter got to be so high. I've seen that happen in XP if the hard drive wasn't formatted. It doesn't get a drive letter until after its formated. The other formatted drives would get C:, D:, etc. I didn't think windows 7 did that anymore but I could be wrong. Like a lot of people, I've only been using it for a short while. Now that the drive is formated it should get the first drive letter C: so a re-install should fix it. It just depends on how much that bothers you as to whether you want to do it over again.

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